Passion for Students Earns Clark Top Student Affairs Award

Posted on: Monday, May 13th, 2013
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by Brent Treash

Todd Clark, associate dean of students at Emory & Henry College, has been selected to receive the James E. Scott Outstanding Mid-Level Student Affairs Professional Award by the National Association of Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education.

Clark competed against higher education professionals from Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.

“I am fortunate to have a great and caring staff to work with,” said Clark.  “We support each other and any recognition like this is simply a product of that teamwork and devotion.”

One of Clark’s biggest professional challenges over the past year has been the improvement of student retention. As part of his responsibilities, Clark provided expertise in regards to new retention software that allows faculty and staff to keep track of student reporting.

“Todd is the type of person who will sit down with anyone for any amount of time to talk with them about a variety of topics – work, school, personal issues, concerns, or just a casual conversation,” said E&H student Katelyn Templeton.

Clark also serves as an advisor to the social fraternities and sororities on campus. In this role, Clark has worked diligently to build a community where each group can grow and learn from one another.

“He has a long list of professional successes and involvement in our field, but it’s his day-to-day interaction and impact on students that make him such a fine mentor, student affairs professional and friend,” said Pam Gourley, vice-president for student life and dean of students.

Inclusion and diversity are two additional areas of personal passion for Clark. His desire for justice for the people in and around the Emory & Henry community has inspired him to take on a leadership role in promoting these passions.

“As a white heterosexual male, Todd isn’t the face one would expect to advocate for minority groups on campus, but he identified a need and has worked to bring awareness,” said Josh von Castle, director of student activities.

“I come from every majority background possible, but I have listened to the stories of those whose life is different from mine and I have learned from their perspective and experience,” said Clark. 

NASPA is the leading association for the advancement, health, and sustainability of the student affairs profession.  Founded in 1919, NASPA comprises more than 13,000 members in all 50 states, 29 countries, and eight U.S. Territories.