Biography

Biography

Originally from Denver, Colorado, Christopher Clary earned bachelor of arts degrees in History and English from the University of Colorado, Boulder and his doctorate in early modern English literature from Northwestern University.  He has taught in Emory & Henry College’s English department since 2012, focusing on the poetry and theatre of the English Renaissance.  His research interests include the interrelation of private practices of curiosity collecting and public theatre in early modern London, the history of gender and sexuality, early modern English national identity, the history of the animal/human divide (and its relative absence in the English Renaissance), and colonial studies.  Dr. Clary also teaches an annual study abroad course on Shakespeare and early modern theatre each spring break in London.   

 

Book Project

Early Modern Theatre and the Culture of Collecting 

My project examines the interrelation of private practices of curiosity collecting and public theatre in early modern London.  It argues that the geographic, cultural, and economic proximity of urban curiosity collections and public playhouses provide the theatre with a unique set of objects and techniques with which to explore and complicate the prominent discursive conflicts of the period.  In it, I engage the ways that plays and playtexts employ the techniques, interests, and rhetorics of curiosity collecting in examinations of national identity and self-estrangement, the relationship between gender and property, court spectacle and Jacobean absolutism, and the material collection and sale of printed plays.  Examining texts by Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton, Rowley, and others, I extend New Historicism’s interest in early modern curiosity as a symptom of colonial expansion to an examination of the material, experiential, and imaginative collaboration of a distinct urban collecting practice and its neighboring dramatic enterprise. 

 

Teaching Experience

Emory & Henry College:

-British Writers 1
-Writing 101: Shakespearean Revision in Early and Recent Modernity
-Writing 101: Gender, Class, and Nation
-World Literature
-Shakespeare
-Foundations 1
-Studies in Drama
-Transitions II, Honors: The Energy in/of New York City
-Emory Abroad: Theatre, Culture, and Politics of Renaissance London

 

Pace University, New York, NY:

-Individual and Society: Shakespeare
-Dress, Desire and Gesture: Sexualit(ies) of Renaissance England
-Individual and Society: Medieval and Early Modern Literature
-Composition: Shakespearean Revision in Early and Recent Modernity
-Critical Writing: Shakespearean Revision in Early and Recent Modernity
-Introduction to Women’s Studies
-Men and Masculinities

 

Northwestern School of Continuing Studies:

-Special Topics in Shakespeare: Culture and Text

 

Northwestern University Medical School:

-Medical Humanities Seminar: Literature in a Time of Epidemic

 

Publication

-“Moll’s Queer Anatomy: The Roaring Girl and Queer Generation” in The Bear Stage: Shaping Shakespeare for Performance.  Eds. Sid Ray and Catherine Loomis. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, forthcoming.

 

Papers and Presentations

-“I know not love…nor will not know it, / Unless it be a boar”: Animal Desire in Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis; or What is Feels Like for a Boar," Shakespeare Association of America seminar, Erotics of Shakespeare’s Poetry, April, 2014
-Chairperson, Blackfriars Conference seminar, Shakespeare and the Performance of Femininity, October, 2013
-“Moll’s Queer Anatomy: The Roaring Girl and Queer Generation,” Blackfriars Conference seminar, Shakespeare and the Performance of Femininity, October, 2013
-“Titus Andronicus and A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Re-vision, Re-reading, and the Contagious Violence of Literary and Dramatic Precedent,” Shakespeare Association of America seminar, Re-reading Shakespeare, Re-reading in Shakespeare, April, 2013
-“Bartholomew Fair and the Spectacle of Curious Englishness,” Shakespeare Association of America seminar, “New World Drama: Beyond The Tempest?" April, 2012
-Invited Lectured: “King Lear: the Body and Radical Indeterminacy,” Pace University, October 26, 2011
-Panelist on Pace University’s joint “Globe Day” Shakespeare event with the Globe Theatre, December 8, 2009
-“Early Modern Theatre and the Culture of Collecting” Newberry Library Fellow’s Seminar, March 31, 2008
 
 

Educational Background

Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Ph.D. in English, December 2010

 

Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

M.A. in English, 2004

 

University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

B.A. in English, B.A. in History, 2003

Magna Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa